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I3UUNEU 



College flewe. 



Vol. 6. No. 15. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1907. 



Price, 5 Cents. 



COLLEGE SETTLEMENT WORK 
AT DENNISON HOUSE. 

At the vesper service on Sunday, Jan- 
uary twentieth, Miss Dudley of Denison 
House gave an account of her work there. 
By way of introduction Miss Dudley gave 
a brief resume of the conditions under 
which the Denison House started fourteen 
years ago, with one house and a very few 
residents in a neighborhood of Syrians, 
Irish and Italians, entirely unaccustomed 
to refinement and the higher standards of 
living. Now there are fourteen residents 
and about fifty outside helpers working 
in the four houses which open convenient- 
ly into each other. There is a co-opera- 
tive home for working girls conducted by 
Miss Bertha Hazard, and some years a 
summer cottage is opened during the 
vacation season. 

The classes are many, accommodating 
six hundred persons a. week; they range 
from the "Sunshine Club" for little chil- 
dren to the "College Extension Clubs" 
and the work with the Italians in con- 
nection with the "Good Government 
Association." In the summer time va- 
cation schools are opened. Not long ago 
a nurse took up her residence at Denison 
House. Besides doing house-to-house 
visiting, this nurse has charge of the 
modified milk station. 

With this growth of working material 
what has been the effect of the Settlement 
upon the community and how far has its 
aim been accomplished? Through the 
clubs and the resulting closer connection 
with the residents, the children have been 
given a little industrial education, but 
what is more important, gentler and more 

obliging manners are rapidly being cul- 
tivated. Their standard of conduct may 
be judged from the fact that none of the 
boys who have gone to the Denison House 
have ever been in court. Perhaps the 
greatest change to be seen is in the men 
who are now taking a keen interest in the 
causes affecting poverty, and all measures 
tending toward more scientific and prac- 
tical adjustment of these matters. 

The intelligent and lively discussions 
about the Beveridge bill and the recent 
exhibition of child labor held in Phila- 
delphia are good examples of their awak- 
ening. As may be inferred from the 
advance made in the standards of the 
people in the immediate neighborhood, 
the whole community has been propor- 
tionately benefited and the ideal of the 
workers, — to show the foreigners, more 
truly, our American ideals, has to a grat- 
ifying extent been realized. R. C. 

SAN FRANCISCO RELIEF WORK. 

On Friday evening, January 25, Mr. 
Moore of Boston talked to the Economics 
Club about the relief work which has been 



done in San Francisco. Mr. Moore, who 
went with three others from Boston to aid 
the sufferers from the earthquake, arrived 
in Oakland a week after the disaster. 
There crowds of homeless people roamed 
the streets, for San Francisco is in such an 
isolated position that it is hundreds of 
miles from any large cities which might 
harbor its refugees. Rooms were very 
scarce and accommodations for three often 
had to serve for twelve. Order was main- 
tained by soldiers with bayonets. The 
confusion was so great and so general that 
Mr. Moore, who went as a helper, said he 
felt decidedly helpless himself. The morn- 
ing after their arrival Mr. Moore and the 
two ladies of the party went over to San 
Francisco. There the)- saw the dreadful 
ruin of property wrought by the fire and 
the great grief brought to many who had 
lost every trace of their nearest and dear- 
est. They found rooms in a cellar where 
a tailor's shop had been, and then tried to 
find work, but that proved more difficult 
than they expected. 

It was in this connection that Mr. Moore 
met Mr. Cushing. Mr. Cushing, he said, 
was a calm, red-headed, blue-eyed man, 
who, onlv a week after the earthquake, 
was able to say: "I am organized." At 
the time of the earthquake Mr. Cushing 
was at San Jose, where the shocks were 
perhaps most violent. He picked himself 
up out of the fallen bricks of the ruined 
hotel and helped rescue others. Then, 
hearing of the destruction ot the Insane 
Asylum, he hurried there and spent that 
day in rescuing those pinned under fallen 
walls, and caring for the dead, and those 
wandering about the grounds. - That 
night he saw the glow in the sky from 
burning San Francisco, and decided to go 
back there. The first few days relief had 
to be given out on a wholesale plan. No 
food was allowed to be sold in the city, but 
all was confiscated for the relief of sufferers. 
Rations were dealt out to one hundred and 
ninety-five thousand people, and free 
transportation was granted to all who 
wished to leave the city. This could not 
last, however. At Mr. Cushing's office aid 
was dispensed with more discrimination. 
According to his system, applications were 
handed in on cards which he looked over 
in the evening and sifted the worthy from 
the unworthy. Whenever sufficient cre- 
dentials were furnished, Mr. Cushing man- 
aged to give the necessary relief. If a 
man could show that he could get work, or 
had some means of support in another 
city, he received a ticket to that place. 
Mr. Cushing afforded this assistance to 
over five thousand. If, with a sewing 
machine, a seamstress could become self- 
supporting, she was given a sewing ma- 
chine. If a man had been successful in the 
grocery business, he could have perhaps 
$500.00 capital for a fresh start. In this 
careful way, Mr. Cushing distributed the 
relief funds to over twenty thousand 
people. 

There were many other noble workers 
in San Francisco. Seven men were ap- 
pointed to take charge of the rehabilitation 
of the city. One of these, Dr. Gunn, was 
remarkable for his energy and activity. 
Late one day these directors received word 
that the railroad would give employment 
to two hundred men if thev would send 



them down. Dr. Gunn asked next day if 
the offer was still good, and finding it was, 
he used it to find employment for many of 
those in his care and to list others who 
were able but unwilling to work, and were 
receiving work unworthily. In an in- 
credibly short time all the ablebodied in 
Dr. Gunn's district were self-supporting. 
Another of the directors, Dr. Howard, had 
a hard district and was not able to show 
results very quickly. He was misunder- 
stood and blamed by those in authority, 
but in the end he was pronounced very 
competent. All these men lost their 
homes and incomes through the disaster, 
but nobly worked hard, day in and day 
out, in giving relief to others, and asked 
no pay for their services. 

Mr. Moore said that instead of the 
wickedness and graft which the newspapers 
report, he found many such deeds of 
heroism and noble self-denial. Especial 
care was taken of the relief funds sent 
from other cities. The salaries of the men 
needed to carry out the work was paid 
from San Francisco's own fund, and all 
checks were countersigned bv four men, 
so that squandering and misuse of the 
relief funds was practically impossible. 



Edward A. MacDowell. 

Many of the readers of College News 
are aware af the fact 'hat our beloved 
composer, MacDowell, has lost his mind 
hrough over-work. James Huneker 
c ays, "Admirers cf Edward MacDowell's 
Sonata Tragica may recall the last move- 
ment, in which, after a triumphant cli- 
max, the curtain rings down on tragic 
misery, overwhelming, unmitigable. It 
was (he very Greek-like belief of Mac- 
Dowell (hat nothing is so sublimely awful 
as to heighten the darkness of tragedy by 
making it follow closely on the heels of 
riumph. This he has accomplished in 
his first sonata, and fa'e has ironically 
transposed to the life Of is composer the 
cruel and tragic drama cf his own music." 

The Mendelssohn Glee Club of New 
York, through a very strong committee, 
has made an appeal to all musicians, to 
all lovers of music, to all patrons of art, to 
! he Amerk an .people, for a sum of money 
to be devoted to the support of MacDowell 
and his family. Men like Joseph H. 
Choate, Grover Cleveland, George B. 
Cortelyou, Hamlin Garland, Henry L. 
Higginson, William Travers Jerome, Seth 
Low, J. Pierpoint Morgan and Bishop 
Potter have endorsed the plan and Henry 
van Dyke has written most eloquently of 
the effort to raise a fund. 

Harvard and Smith are both interesting 
themselves in the project and the Welles- 
ley Department of Music has arranged an 
interesting concert for Wednesday, Febru- 
ary 13, at 4-20, P.M., in Billings Hall, 
particulars of which will be announced in 
next week's College News. 

I hope we may have hearty support 
from the college in this undertaking. 
Tickets will be fifty cents. Advance sub- 
scriptions for this concert (or for the fund, 
independent of the concert) will be gladly 
received by the department. 

Hamilton C Macdougall. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Colle ge TR ews. 

Press of N. A. Lindsey 4 Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, J1.00 a 
year to resident and non-resident. 

All business correspondence should be addressed to 
Miss Florence Plummer, Business Manager College 
Vfwr • . T 

All subscriptions Bhould be sent to Miss Ellsa- 
■ : beth Condit. 



Editor-in-Chief, Alice W Farrar. 1908 

Associate Editor. Elizabeth Andrews, 190S 

Literary Editors. 

Leah Curtis. 1908 Estelle E. Littlefield, 1908 

Agnes E. Rothery. 1909 

Alumni Editor, 

Caroline Fletcher. 

Managing Editors, 

■ Florence Plummer, 1907 Elisabeth Condit 1907 

. Emma McCarrol, 1908 Anna Brown, 1909 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12. 
1903, at the Post Office, at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress. March 3, 1879." 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO., 

JEWELLERS AND SILVERSMITHS, 
BOSTON. 

Fine Stationery, Umbrellas, Parasols, 
Wedding Gifts. 

Official Makers of the Wellesley Seal 
Pin. 

Jewelry Repairing. 



JOSEPH Q. LOWELL 



OSMON C. BAILEY 



LOWELL BROS. & BAILEY, 

General Commission Merchants 
and Wholesale Dealers in 

foreign & Domestic fruits & Produce of All Kinds. 

73 and 75 Clinton Street, Boston. 
Ref.: Fourth Nat. Bk., Boston Fruit & Produce Ex. 



A week ago last Saturday the schedule 
of mid-year examinations was posted on 
the elevator bulletin board. Since then, 
-that place has been a center of attraction, 
i At; almost any moment in the day some 
: one may be seen standing there studying 
Ythis schedule with a look of general de- 
', spondency upon her countenance. 

A short time before the posting of the 
'examination schedule, there appeared in 
the elevator a little red card upon which 
was printed a notice, short but to the 
point — "Don't worry." Whether there 
is any intentional connection between the 
'little notice within the elevator and the 
long and varied mid-year notices posted 
on the bulletin without, we do not know. 
. If -we ourselves would make the con- 
nection, it might be of great advantage to 

lis. 

• Of course we must all admit that it is a 
-thousand times easier to say "Don't 
: worry" than to banish all anxiety from 
irar minds. Nevertheless, we can at 
-least try not to worry but to remember 
•that after all. most of us have been through 
mid-years before and still survive in a 
more or less sound condition both mental- 
ly :and physically. We know that as 
soon as examinations are over, what ap- 



rrs a 



FOWNES 



THAT'S ALL YOU 
NEED TO KNOW 
ABOUT A GLOVE 



peared beforehand to be a threatening 
night-mare is remembered only vaguely 
as a more or less unpleasant dream. 

To you. Freshmen, who have never be- 
fore taken college examinations we would 
offer the consolation that mid-years will 
not be half so formidable as you have im- 
agined ; for examinations so terrifying 
can exist only in the minds of Freshmen, 
never in reality. It may seem incredible, 
but students have been known to find the 
good times indulged in at mid-years, a 
more than just compensation for all the 
less pleasant features, although they sel- 
dom admit it just at this time of the year. 
It is quite "the thing" in the minds of 
some people to give way to one's doleful 
feelings at mid -years. We hear the woes 
of our friends and match their accounts 
with tales of our own troubles — more 
examinations and longer paper, in iar 
more difficult subjects, coming at much 
more inconvenient times. And so the 
misery grows. 

Much of this unnecessary misery arises 
from the fact that we look at examinations 
in a wholly false light. They are not, 
and never were intended to be, instru- 
ments of torture devised by the Faculty 
for use upon the students. If this were 
their purpose, the faculty might some- 
times consider themselves equally tor- 
tured in having to read the piles upon 
piles of blue books which we fill. 

Under ideal conditions there would be 
no need of examinations. All students 
would be doing their best and most con- 
scientious work all the time and if a gen- 
eral review of the work would be valuable, 
they would make it of their own accord. 
If there are any students of this ideal 
kind, they will have to be examined with 
the vast majority. The vast majority 
of students, as we all know, falls far short 
of this idea; they need a stimulus and 
must be examined to prove to their in- 
structors that they have at least the re- 
quired knowledge of the subjects which 
they are taking. This then is the prima- 
ry purpose of our examinations. 

Those who have done their work faith- 
fully and well each day do not need to 
worry; those who have not cannot afford 
to waste their time in worrying, for here 
is the great opportunity for atoning for 
all deficiencies in the past. 



NOTICE. 

Copy for College News should be in 
the hands of the editors by Friday noon 
of each week. It is desirable that all 
communications be written in ink, rather 
than in pencil, and on one side of the 
sheet only. The departments are in 
charge of the following editors: 
General Correspondence . . Alice W. Farrar 
College Calendar I Elizabet h Andrews 

College Notes ) 

Library Notes ) 

Music Notes ^Estelle E. Littlefield 

Society Notes J 

Free Press 1 

Art Notes [ Leah T. Curtis 

Athletic Notes J 

Parliament of Fools. . .Agnes E. Rothery ' 

Alumna? Notes Miss Fletcher 



Officers of Student Government 
Association. 

President Florence F. Besse 

Vice-president Olive Smith 

Secretary Ethel V. Grant 

Treasurer Betsey Baird 

Senior Member Margaret Noyes 

Junior Member Elizabeth Perot 

Sophomore Member . . . Margaret Kennedy 

Office Hours. 

President: Thursday, rr. 30-12. 30 P.M. 
Friday, 2.30-3.00 P.M. 

Vice-president: 

Wednesday, 10. 50-11. 35 A.M. 

Thursday, 10. 50-11. 35 A.M. 

Saturday, n. 40-12. 30 A.M. 



SAVES HOSIERY 



NEVER SLIPS, TEARS 
NOR UNFASTENS 

Every Pair 

Warranted 

The 




CUSHION 
BUTTON 



HOSE 
SUPPORTER 



If ycjr Dealer does not sell you this 
Supporter he does not sell the Best 

Every Clasp has the name WBT~ 
Stamped on the Metal Loop 1 ^^^ 

GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, Boston, Mass. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



3 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Thursday, January 31, at 7.30, P.M., in College Hall Chapel, 
regular mid-week prayer meeting of the Christian Asso- 
ciation. 

Sunday, February 3, at n, A.M., services in Houghton Memo- 
rial Chapel. Sermon by Rev. John H. Denison of Boston. 
Communion service. 

7, P.M., vespers with address by Mrs. Labaree, Traveling 
Secretary of the Student Volunteer Band. 

Monday, February 4, at 7.30, P.M., in Billings Hall, Violin 
Recital by Mr. Foster, Mr. Hamilton accompanist. 

Tuesday, February 5, mid-year examinations begin. 

Wednesday, February 6, at 4.20, P.M., in Billings Hall, Sym- 
phony Lecture by Professor Macdougall. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



At a service held in Billings Hall, on Sunday afternoon, Jan- 
uary twentieth, Mr. Joseph Elkinton gave an address upon 
"Mysticism," and Mr. Alfred Garret upon "Silence." 

Miss Locke's normal class met. on Tuesday evening, January 
22. The subject discussed was "Confucianism." 

Miss Willye Anderson, 1908, has resigned from the office of 
Vice-President of the Barnswallow Society, as she will not re- 
turn to college this year. 

A reception was given at the Observatory on Wednesday 
afternoon, January twenty-third, by Professor Whiting in honor 
of Mrs. Dorothea Klumpke Roberts, a distinguished astronomer 
from England. Among outside guests present were Mrs. 
Whitin, Miss Julie Klumpke, Mrs. Fleming and Miss Cannon 
from Harvard Observatory, Mrs. Elihu Thompson of Lynn, 
Rev. and Mrs. George Cutter. 

Miss Scudder led the Christian Association meeting of Jan- 
uary 24, and chose for her subject "The Fine Art of Christian 
Living." Miss Scudder said that the secret of the Christian 
life was the consciousness of God, which, she showed, is revealed 
in different ways to different people. The middle ages believed 
that this consciousness was best attained through abstraction 
from life, but we believe that to live most nobly is to live with 
one's fellowmen. To remember that our time is precious, to 
choose that which will bring us nearest God, both in our inner 
and outer life, and to let His spirit be in all our work and play, 
is to live a Christian life. 

On Friday evening, January 25, in the Faculty Parlor at 
College Hall, Mr. John F. Moore of Boston, spoke upon the 
"Relief Work Done in San Francisco." Mr. Moore went out 
to San Francisco immediately after the disaster to represent 
the Massachusetts contributors. During his stay of several 
months there he worked hard himself at the most practical 
details. Mr. Moore spoke at the invitation of the Economics 
Club. 

Miss Elizabeth Perry, formerly of 1908, visited college last 
week. 



A meeting of the Graduate Club was held on Tuesday evening, 
January 29. 

A Conference on Child Labor is to be held, by the courtesy 
of the Twentieth Century Club, at 3 Joy street, Boston, on 
Wednesday evening, January 30, at 8, P.M. Addresses will 
be made by the following: Governor Guild, (official engagements 
permitting) ; Professor Samuel McCune Lindsay, Secretary of 
the National Child Labor Committee, upon "The Federal 
Control of Child Labor;" Mr. John Golden, President of the 
United Textile Workers of America; and Miss Florence Mar- 
shall of the Boston Trade School for Girls. -• ■'-> 

Members of the College community and especially those 
living in the village, will be glad to know of the abundant good 
things to be had at the Woman's Exchange, on Washington 
street, just beyond the express office. Every day delicious 
whole wheat bread may be obtained; and in small or large 
portions, all at reasonable prices, salads, soups, croquettes, 
fish balls, sandwiches, pies, cakes and candies. The Saturday 
baked beans and small loaves of brown bread are in especial 
demand. Orders are taken for the beans and brown bread, as: 
well as for any of the other good supplies. 

Glee Club Concert Dinners, 

February 22 and 23 

—AT— 

THE WELLESLEY INN. 



5.30 and 6.30 P.M. 



Reserve Tables at Once 



STURTEVANT & HALEY, 
BEEF AND SUPPLY CO 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON. 

Telephone 933 Richmond. hotel supplies a specialty. 




FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HOTHOUSE PRODUCTS. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO HOTEL, CLUB AND FAMILY ORDERS. 



ISAAC LOCKE <& CO., 

97, 99 and lOl Faneuil Hall Market. 



L. P. HOLLANDER <& CO. 

Outfitters for VOUING LADIES. 

A. Large Assortment of 

YOUNG LADIES' SUITS, WAISTS AND COATS, 

To order and Ready =to= Wear. Also many 

Novelties in Hosiery, Veils, Neckwear and Gloves. 

202 to 216 Boylston St reet and Park Square, Boston 



COLLEGE NEWS 



MUSIC NOTES. 



On Sunday evening, January 27, 1907, a vesper service with 
special music was held in the Memorial Chapel. Following is 
the service list: 
Processional 78S'. 

Service Anthem: "The Strain Upraise" D. Buck 

Organ : Andante in F Beethoven 

Choir: "Abide With Me" Barnby 

Organ: Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger. 

Prayer from "Rienzi" Wagner 

Recessional 527. 

The Wellesley College Choir. 
Solos by Miss Whi'.ney, Miss Mcintosh and Miss Wheeler. 
Professor Macdougall, Organist. 



On Tuesday afternoon, January 29, 1907, a recital was given 
in Billings Hall, at 4.20, P.M., by students in the Department of 
Music. 

Program. 

Nocturne in B major Chopin 

"Au Ruisseau" Schutt 

Miss Ethel M. Hull, 1907. 

'Love's Madrigal Kenneth Rae 

"Adoration Borowski 

Miss Elizabeth A. Judkins, Special. 

Piano: Gavotte in B minor Bach — Saint Saens 

"Spinning Song" Mendelssohn 

Miss Katherine von Ach, 1907. 

Voice: "Deep in a Rose's Glowing Heart" E. Nevin 

Miss Whitaker, 191 1. 

Organ : Overture in C minor Hollins 

Miss Jessie D. Buchanan, Special. 



Piano: 



Voice: 
Violin 



There will be no Symphony Program January 30, 1907 



MID=YEAR MUSIC, 1907. 



Tuesday, February 5. 

"Rondo" Morandi 

"Wellesley March" E. Corinne Locke (1906) 

Wednesday, February 6. 

"Festal March" Smart 

Overture, "Carmen" Bizet 

Thursday, February 7. 

" Humoreske" Dvorak 

"Saint Cecilia Offertoire" Batiste 

Friday, February 8. 

First movement from the "American" Symphony, Dvorak 
"Marche Militaire" Schubert 



Saturday, February 9. 

Impromptu on themes from "Faust" 



.Gounod 



WELLESLEY SENIORS. 

A young ladies' school to open next 
October offers an exceptional opportun- 
ity to a Wellesley Senior contemplating 
teaching next year. 

Full particulars may be had by addressing: 

RICHARD D. CURRIER, 

1 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Blanket Wraps, Kimonas, Breakfast 
Wraps and Waists, 

$2.75 to $35. 

Ready=to=Wear Shirt Waists, 
$3.50 to $15. 

Ladies' Stocks, Belts, Gloves. 

Ladies' Storna Coats, in Rubber, Silk, 
Wool and Barberbry's English make. 

Fownes' Heavy Street Gloves, Hand 
Sewn, $1.50. 

Golf Sweaters and every requisite, 
$3.50 and up. 

' ^a Washington and 

W"* 3™g. Summer Streets. 

/ , ' Boston, U.S.A. 



PREFERRED STOCK 



Mocha and <J;iv,-i Coffee, 

1 lb. ami 2 lb. Cans. 



A Wellesley Print=Shop 



THE HIGHEST GRADE COFFEE. 

MARTIN L HALL & CO., BOSTON 

When in 
ne ed of 

particular printing, promptly done at reasonable prices, call at the 
most convenient place, where modern equipment and expert work- 

men guar MAUGUS PRINTING CO. 

antee sat- 
isfaction. Wellesley Square. 

Boston and Haine Railroad 

Lowest Rates. Fast Train Service between Boston and Chicago, St. Louis, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis and all points West, Northwest and Southwest. 

Pullman Palace or Sleeping Cars on all through lines. For tickets and 
information apply at any principal ticket office of the Company. 

D. J. FLANDERS, Gen'l. Pass, and Tkt. Agt., Boston. 

THE WALNUT Hill SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 

NATICK, MASS. 



Tuition and Board, $700. 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow, Principals. 

Wigs, Beards, Etc., to Hire for Amateur Theatricals and all Stage 
Productions. Grease Paints, Powders, Burnt Cork, Rouges, Etc. 



JV1. 



SUATTERY, 

Theatrical and 
Street 



I 



26 Tremont Street, Boston, 

Between Eliot and LaGrange Sts. 

Opp. Majestic Theater 

Hair Work of Every Description. 
Special Attention Given to Order Work 



Wigs 



COLLEGE NEWS 



A New Book with Snap and Spice 

ADAM'S SONS 

By A. Q. LEARNED 
One of America's Cleverest Artists 

This book is filled with the brightest and spiciest 
sayings about men. ...... 

Every page illustrated. Great book for women to 
give men. ....... 

Something of interest on every page. Something 
to hit every man you know. ... 

For Sale by C. W. Davis H. L. Flagg 
Price, $1.50 



MID=YEAR MUSIC, 1907— Continued. 

Tuesday, February 12. 

"Evening Star" March from "Tannhauser" Wagner 

Wednesday, February 13. 

"Berceuse" Kinder 

Overture ' ' Rosamunde" Schubert 

Thursday, February 14. 

Humorous variations on a German Air in the styles 
of Bach, Hadyn, Mozart, Johann Strauss, Verdi, 
Gounod and Wagner S. Ochs 

Friday, February 15. 

Variations on the Austrian Hymn J . Haydn 

March from "Le Prophete" Meyerbeer 

Saturday, February 16. 

Request program. Requests may be sent through the 
resident mail. 



FREE PRESS. 



I. 

May 1 advise the members of the College, through the Free 
Press, to "look up and not down" these winter evenings, and 
see a combination in the sky which will not be again witnessed 
for twelve years. 

The brilliant planet Jupiter occupies nearly the center of the 
finest constellations in the heavens. Around it are at least 
eleven bright stars with names. Get some of the astronomy 
girls to point them out: Sirius, Procyon, Castor and Pollux, 
Capella, Beteluense, Bellatrix, Rigel, Saiph, Aldeberan. 

The far-famed legion of the Southern Cross cannot approach 
this northern grouping of stars for splendor at any time, cer- 
tainly not when Jupiter, as now, is in their midst. 

Sarah F. Whiting. 

II. 

One day last week a sympathizing friend took off Sigard's 
muzzle and let him go free. She probably did not know that her 
deed of mercy put the dog's life in jeopardy. The selectmen of 
the town of Wellesley have instructed the police to kill any dog 
found running at large and unmuzzled. 

Will Sigard's many friends assist him to obey the law in a 
cheerful spirit? Katherine Coman. 




The Burson Stocking 
is knit to shape in leg, 
ankle, heel, foot and toe 
without seam, corner or 
uneven thread anywhere. 
It keeps its shape. 

The Burson is the only 
stocking in the world 
thus knit. 

A new pair for every 
pair that fails is our 
guarantee. 



i Above we sliow the BtTRSON and the ""others"— 
turned inside out— note the difference. 



BOSTON 



FURS 

Mink (American Sabie), Black lynx, Ermine and Chinchilla 

ARE FASHIONABLE FOR THIS WINTER. 

We are showing the correct and fashionable models in these furs 

and many others. 

Fur-Lined Coats for all occasions 

Fur and Fur Trimmed Hats in the Newest Designs 

OUR PRICES ARE REASONABLE 
OUR GOODS are all marked in plain figures. 

OUR PRICE IS THE SAME to all purchasers 
We Ask Your Inspection. 



GEO. L. GRIFFIN & SON, 

Hatters and Furriers, 

404 Washington Street, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

THE IINDIAIN STORE, 

186 Boylston Street, Boston 



Indian Baskets, Moccasins, Etc. 

Japanese Goods, Curios, Odd and Useful Articles for 



Girls. 



ARTISTIQUE NOVELTY COMPANY 

MLLE. MARIA 

GOWNS SHIRT-WAIST SUITS 

A SPECIALTY 

Embroideries of all kinds on Silk, Wool and Linen. 

French Lingeries, Fancy Articles, Novelties for Christmas Gifts 

Special Rates to Students. 

480 Boylston Street, 3d floor 

TeL 3628-1 Back Bay 



COLLEGE NEWS 



EDWARD KAKAS (Q. SONS, 

High Grade Furs, 

3 a 4 Boylston Street. 

Special Discount to Students. 



lowMtys 



CHOCOLATES 



SOc and 60c per lb. 
DELICIOUS— DAINTY— PURE. 

416 Washington St., (4th door North of Summer St.) 



MRS. H. E. CURRIER, 

10 Grove St., Wellesley. 

F. DIEHL & SON, 

Dealers in 

Coal, Wood, Hay & Grain, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Telephone No. 16-4. 

F. A. COOLIDGE & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Choice Meats and Provisions, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

M. G. SHAW, 

Watchmaker and Optician, 

Agent for the Provident Life 

and Trust Co. 
Wellesley, - JVIass. 

SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs, 

2 and 4 New faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON 
F. H. PORTER., 

Plumbing and Heating. 

Hardware, Skates and Hock- 
eys, Curtain Rods and Fixtures, 
Cutlery and Fancy Hardware, 
Kitchen Furnishings for the 
Club Houses. 

H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, 

Stationery, Etc. 

WRIGHT S D1TS0N SPORTING GOODS. 

Waban Block, Wellesley Sq. 

John A. Morgan & Co. 
PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, 
WELLESLEY. 

HARRISON SWAN & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Poultry and Wild Game, 

1 faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 

Telephone Richmond 883-2. 



HONORS FOR MLLE PUTHOD. 



The gratifying news of fresh laurels won by a member of the 
Department of French has just been received from Paris in the 
shape of a diploma, a copy of which we give below : 

R6publique Francaise 
Ministere de 1' Instruction publique, des Beaux- Arts et des 

Cultes. 

Le Ministre de l'Instruction publique, des Beaux Arts et 
des Cultes, 

Vu l'article 32 du d^cret organique du 17 mars 1808; 

Vu les ordonnances royales des 14 novembre 1844, 9 septem- 
bre, 1845 et ier novembre 1846; 

Vu les de'crets des 9 decembre 1850, 7 avril et 27 dScembre 
1866, 24 decembre 1885 et 4 dout 1898, 

Arrgte : 
Mademoiselle Valentine Puthod, Professeur de langue at 
litterature franchises h Wellesley College (Massachusetts) est 
nommee Officier d'Academie. 

Pour Ampliation: 
Le Directeur du Cabinet, Jules Gauthier. 

Fait a Paris le 30 novembre 1906. 
Le Ministre de l'Instruction publique, des Beaux Arts et des 
Cultes, 

Sign^: Aristide Briand. 

Mile. Puthod has recently won distinction in the field of letters. 
From time to time papers written by her have appeared in 
French periodicals and been judged most favorably. 

Everyone will rejoice in her success. 



THEATER NOTES. 



Colonial: — Clyde Fitch's comedy, "Captain Jinks." Special 
matinee, Thursday, January 31, Ibsen's "A Doll's House." 
Majestic: — "Mrs. Fiske in "The New York Idea." 
Hollis: — William Faversham in "The Squaw Man." 
Boston: — "Ben Hur." 
Tremont: — Henrietta Crossman in " All-of-a-Sudden Peggy. 



Exhibitions Now Open in Boston. 



St. Botolph Club. 
Boston Art Club. 
Vose's Galleries. 
Rowland's Galleries. 
Doll & Richards. 

Cobb's Galleries. 
Williams & Everett's. 
Hatfield's Galleries. 
Kimball's Galleries. 



Pictures by Boston Painters. 
Seventy-Fifth Exhibition. 
Ideal Figure Pictures. 
Mr. Redfield's Landscapes. 
Mr. Coleman's Paintings. 
Rembrandt's Etchings. 
Miss Goettling's Paintings. 
Mr. Pope's Portraits. 
Japanese Prints. 
Japanese Prints. 



Fine Athletic Goods 

LawnTennis, Foot Ball, 
BasKet Ball, Hoc Key 
SticKs, Hockey Skates, 
SKating Shoes, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys and all 
Kindsof Athletic Cloth- 
ing and Athletic Im- 
plements, 

Catalogue Free to any address. 

WRIGHT (SL DITSON 

Boston and Cambridge, Mass. Chicago, III. Providence, R.I. 




J. TA1LBY (Sb SON, 

FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. Railroad Station, 

Orders by mail or otherwise promptly attended to. 
Connected by Telephone. 

BUY THE BEST 




CHOCOLATES. 
"The Taste Tells." 

MISS G. L. LEWIS, 
Picture Framer, 

515 Pierce Building, Copley Square, Boston. 

Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays, 9 to 5. 
May I assist you in your Picture Work ? 

James Korntved, 

Ladies' and Gent's Custom Tailor 

SHAW BLOCK, ROOM i 
WELLESLEY SQUARE. 
Special attention paid to Pressing 
and Cleaning. 

Hot Chocolate 

with Whipped Cream — the entirely 
different kind — served at our fountain 
for 5c. 

Coffee, Beef Tea, Asparox, Malted 
Milk, Ginger, Tomato, Clam Bouillon 
— all served hot in porcelain mugs, 5c 

Sexton's Pharmacy. 
R. F. EVANS, 

Painter and Decorator, 

Hanging and Tinting. Paper. 

All Mail Orders Promptly Attended to. 

P. O. BOX 66 

458 Washington St., Wellesley 

Pianos for Rent. 

SPECIALTY: A small piano with 
a big tone. This piano is used 
extensively by Yale students. 

DERBY'S PIANO ROOMS, 

Clark's Block, - - Natick 




COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 

This column will contain items concerning Alumnse, former 
students, and past and present members of the Faculty. Other 
items will occasionally be added which are thought to be of es- 
pecial interest to the readers of the Alumna? Notes. 



I 



On December 5, 1906, a lecture was given before the Wellesley 
Hills Woman's Club by Professor Kendall of the History De- 
partment. Her subject was "Burmah," and her lecture was 
illustrated by stereopticon slides made from photographs taken 
during her recent visit to that country. 

Earlier in the year before this same club Miss Caroline J. 
Cook, 1S84, lectured on "Everyday Contracts." 

Miss Grace B. Townsend, 1896, is teaching this year in Wil- 
mington, Delaware. 

Miss Mary B. Pratt, 1889-1891, is-teaching a Model Kinder- 
garten in Washington, D. C. 

Miss Ruth I. Eager, 1902, is doing graduate work in history 
at Wellesley. 

Miss Olive C. Ambler, 1901, is teaching in Gardner, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Miss Viola Shearon, 1906, is teaching history in the High 
School at Le Mars, Iowa. 

Miss L. Gertrude Loker, 1906, is studying this year at Sim- 
mons College, Boston, and recently received the first prize in a 
college poster competition. 

The Boston Wellesley College Club will hold a luncheon at the 
Hotel Vendome, Boston, on Saturday, February 9th, at 1, P.M. 
Speeches will be made by officers and alumnse of the College. 
A cordial invitation is hereby extended to all former students of 
the College, not already identified with the club, to become 
members, and all wishing to join are asked to send their names 
to the secretary, Miss M. Louise Stockwell, 23 Orkney Road, 
Brookline, before February 4. In addition to the annual dues 
of one dollar, a charge of fifty cents will be made for all who 
wish to attend the luncheon. 

The Minneapolis Wellesley Association held their annual ban- 
quet on January 3, 1907, at which thirty members were present. 
Mrs. Alice Ames Winter, 1886, was toast mistress, and the 
following toasts were given: 

"The Under Graduates" Beata Werdenhoff, 190S 

"Just Out of College" Carolyn Dayton, 1906 

"The Graduates" Blanche Wells, 1902 

Mrs. Brook and Miss Eveers also spoke. 

On Wednesday, January 16, several members of the class of 
1906, living in and about New York City, held an informal 
reunion, consisting of a luncheon at the Hotel Regent, followed 
by a Peter Pan theater party. Those present were Sallie 
Eustis, Sadie Samuel, Marion Carlisle, Emilie Calloway, Elsie 
Goddard, Alice Ames, Helen Segar, Ethel Smalley, Helen Por- 
ter, Marion Stephenson, Edna Moore. 

CHANGES OF ADDRESSES. 

Miss Beatrice Stepanck, 1895, 419 West 118 street, New 
York City. 

Mrs. Mary Belle Truesdale Bradley, i893-'94, 17 Holland 
avenue, Westfield, Massachusetts. 

Mrs. Lelia Eaton Farleigh, 1900, 200 Van Houten avenue, 
Passaic, New Jersey. 

Miss Helen E. Lucas, 1903, East Carver, Mass. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Elsie Van Frie Roberts, 1903, to Rev. Frederick H. 
Steenstra, of Grace Church, New York City. 

Miss Grace E. Stilwell, 1902, to Mr. Louis Radcliffe Boswell, 
of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Miss Elizabeth Taylor, 1904, to Mr. Milliner of Fairport, 
New York. 

MARRIAGES. 

Latham — Mansfield. October 1, 1906, at Medford, Massa- 
chusetts, Alice Gertrude Mansfield, 1897-1898, to David C. 
Latham of Clinton, Massachusetts. 



Every Requisite for 



2)aint£ Xuncb 



AT 



COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., 

55 to 61 Summer Street, 

( Only one block from Washington St.) 



The Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume. 

COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
iVIalters of the 




Caps, Gowns and Hoods 

to Wellesley, Radcliffe, Mount Holyoke, Bryn 
Mawr, Barnard, Woman's College of Baltimore, 
Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Univ. of Pa., Dartmouth, Brown, 
Williams, Amherst, Colorado College, Stanford and the others. 

CORRECT HOODS FOR ALL DEGREES. 

Illustrated bulletin and samples on request. ( Annie W. Stock- 
ing, Wellesley, 1902, in charge of correspondence.) 



BAILEY, BANKS & BIDDLE CO. 



Diamond Merchants 



Jewelers 



Stationers 



The Stationery Department supplies the highest grade of 

COLLEGE AND FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

PROGRAMMES CLASS CUTS 

DANCE CARDS MENUS 

CLASS DAY INVITATIONS, ETC. 
Special designs and estimates submitted free of charge 

1218=20-22 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Mr. Albert M. Kanrich, 

VIOLINIST and HUSICAL DIRECTOR, 

Begs to announce that he is prepared to furnish the best 
musicians (orchestral or band) for all occasions. Or- 
chestrations, etc., etc. 

RECOMMENDED BY THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT AT WELLESLEY. 

Telephone I64A Ti-emont St., Boston 



Houser — Ruddle. December 16, 1907, in East Mauch 
Chunk, Pennsylvania, Elinor Frances Ruddle, 1903, to Rev. 
Norton Thomas Houser. At home after the first of February 
in Auburn, New York. 

Clements — Platt. January 12, 1907, at New Britain, 
Connecticut, Bertha D. Platt, 1904, to Joseph H. Clements, Jr. 
of Schenectady, New York. 

BIRTHS. 

October 1, 1906, a second son to Mrs. Lilian Favour Abbott, 
1894-1S99. 

DEATHS. 

January 19, 1907, in Boston, Massachusetts, Mrs. Mary 
Lauderburn Rhoades, 1890. 

October 28, 1906, at Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts, Mr. 
William O. Robson, father of Mrs. Marion Robson Travis, 
formerly of 1903 and Miss Olive R. Robson, 1893-95, 1896-97. 

October 12, 1906, the mother of Helen E. Lucas, 1903. 

January 15, 1906, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, Emily 
Stewart Howard, 1892. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



Society Zeta Alpha held its monthly program meeting at the 
society house, Saturday evening, January 26, 1907. The fol- 
lowing program was given: 
Introduction of Pastoral Elements into English 

Literature Marion Waugh 

Shepherd's Calendar Mary McDougall 

Pastoral Lyrics Maude C. Bradfield 

Pastoral Elegies : Margaret Jones 



The regular monthly program meeting of the Shakespeare 
Society was held in the society house, Saturday evening, Janu- 
ary 26, 1907. The following program was given: 

Papers. 

Pleasant Types in "A Winter's Tale" Carol Sawyer 

Nature in the "Winter's Tale" Gladys Brown 

Shakespeare News Helen Cummings 

Scenes. 

"Taming of the Shrew." 

Act. III. Scene I. 

Katherine Dorothea Lockwood 

Bianca Margaret Seccombe 

Baptista Margaret Erwin 

Gremio Helen Eustis 

Lucentio Florence Besse 

Petruchio Dorothy Storey 

Hortensio Helen Knowles 

Franio Betty More 

Servant Ruth Stephenson 



The Alpha Kappa Chi Society held its regular monthly pro- 
gram meeting in the society house, January 26, 1907, at 7.30 
P.M. The following program was given: 
The Wandering of Odysseus, 

Odyssey Books IX-XIII Hattie Brown 

Reading — "The Lotos-Eaters" Tennyson 

Elizabeth Gordon 

Art Representations in the Books Studied Edith Becker 

Classical News Jean Aiken 



At a regular meeting of the Phi Sigma Fraternity held Janu- 
ary 26, 1907, at the Chapter House, the following program was 
presented: 
Summary of the Second Period of Provencal 

History Isabel Rawn 

The Origin and Significance of the Provencal 

Court of Love Helen Goddard 

Representation of a Court of Love: 

Queen Laura Kimball 

Attendants Winifred Reed, Emily Shonk 

Troubadours, 

Genevieve Pfeiffer, Dorothy Fuller, Katherine Scott 
Chevaliers, Genevieve Washburn, Leah Curtis, Helen Curtis 



On Saturday evening, January 26, 1907, the regular monthly 
program meeting of the Tau Zeta Epsilon Society was held in 
the society house. Following is the program: 

Current Art Topics Miss Douglas 

Music Bulletin Notes Miss Condit 

The Impressionistic School in France Miss Plummer 

French Mural Decorations Miss Doten 

Pictures Given. 
Breton Peasants Collet 

Models: Miss Peterson, Miss Mitchell, Miss Douglas. 
Jean D'arc Bastien Lepage 

Model: Miss McClary. 
Portrait Manet 

Model: Miss Pope. 

At a formal meeting of the Agora Society held Saturday even- 
ing, January 26, 1907, the following program was given- 

Impromptu Speeches. 
"The New Independence of France" Eleanor Little 



"The Earthquake in Jamaica" Ruth French 

"Beginning of a New Era in Persia" Clara Griffin 

Formal Program. 

"Child Labor Conditions in Central and Northern 

States" Harriet Small 

"The Problem of Education of Working Chil- 
dren' ' Julia Larimer 

"Work of Women's Clubs in Relation to Child 

Labor" Marion Durrell 

(read by E. Little) 

PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 

(This "Bit of Ancient History" is a true story sent to us by 
an English friend, who remembers about the visit of Sir Richard 
Temple to Wellesley. This was in the early days of the College, 
when Miss Freeman was the president.) 

"A BIT OF ANCIENT HISTORY." 
Conversation between Miss Freeman (Lady Principal) and Sir 
Richard Temple. 
"Does it increase their chances 
(It sorely me doth vex) 
This higher education 

Of the rising female sex? 
Does it increase their chances 

Euripides to learn, 
[Twixt a Rhombus and a Rhomboid 

The diff'rence to discern?" 
So asked a mighty Gov'nor 

Of Lady Principal 
Who often asks hard questions 
A Solon to appall. 

" Does it increase their chances? 
I do not understand; 
Explain yourself, great Gov'nor, 
From India's coral strand." 

" Does it increase their chances 
Of Matrimony sweet, 
To wear a bright blue stocking 
Upon~their charming feet?" 

" I do not know, great Gov'nor, 

I have not ask'd them, Sir. 
I've never called a lassie, 

And prying questioned her. 
Perhaps if you should ask them, 

They'd soon make bare their hearts, 
And show to you, great Gov'nor, 

Fair^Cupid's piercing darts." 

Conclusion. 
But there the matter ended, 

Sir Richard had his fears, 
And would not ask the lassies 

"What are your chances, dears?" 



A DOGGEREL. 
Sigard said, "I think its hard 

That we are muzzled so!" 
' ' I tell you we are strapped for sure, 

Said jocund Bobby Lowe. 

Sigard said, with bitterness, 

His muzzled nose alert, 
"I feel ridiculous; — in fact 

My dignity is hurt." 

But Bobby said, "I think it does 
Our beauty much enhance. 

Beside, a muzzle acts, you know, 
As suspenders to our pants,"